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10-08-20 | News

Art in Public Places

Miami-Dade County, Florida

Chromatic Induction in a Double Frequency
Carlos Cruz-Diez
Constantly changing according to the intensity of light and the distance between the work and the spectator, the design of the paving system is a tribute to Cruz-Diez' lifelong experiments in color theory, science and kinetics. Image courtesy of the artist and Art in Public Places, Miami-Dade County Department of Cultural Affairs
A Memorial Bowing
Daniel Arsham, Snarkitecture
This commemorative artwork recalls the enormous MIAMI ORANGE BOWL sign from the stadium that stood on this site from 1937 until its demolition in 2008. As visitors move through the plaza, they create new alignments between the letters, spelling out different words as they glimpse the new stadium through fragments of the old. Image Noah Kalina courtesy of Art in Public Places, Miami-Dade County Department of Cultural Affairs
The Bollard Project
Jim Drain
Bright, expressive color combinations transform the utilitarian function of bollards into a signature work of public art for PortMiami. The artist-designed bollards are thoughtfully arranged in color sequences and rigorous geometries that reference maritime flag signage. Viewed as a whole, the installation's vibrant colors and rhythmic patterns recreate the celebratory 'bon voyage' moments experienced by all cruise passengers. Image Markus Haugg courtesy of Art in Public Places, Miami-Dade County Department of Cultural Affairs
The Ripple Garden
Mikyoung Kim
A series of sculptural gardens offer respite from the activities of this community hospital and the everyday world. The proposed project, which offered design solutions for the Therapeutic Garden, Respite Garden, Entry Gardens and Everglades Passageway, will create an art environment that layers the natural materials of water, earth, native vegetation, stone and reclaimed wood with recycled glass and terrazzo paving. By utilizing the formation of water ripples in multiple layers and scales throughout the exterior spaces, the design of the gardens will form a comprehensive, fluid experience for hospital patients, staff and visitors. Image courtesy of the artist and Art in Public Places, Miami-Dade County Department of Cultural Affairs
Slide Mantra
Isamu Noguchi
A massive 29-ton sculpture carved from Carrara marble by the late Japanese American artist, this lyrical and playful work, sited in Miami's Bayfront Park, is more than ten-feet tall and functions as a slide with steps up the back and a spiral descent. Noguchi designed Bayfront Park in 1986 and created Slide Mantra the same year to represent the United States at its art pavilion in the Venice Biennale. In this piece, appropriately sited in a city park, Noguchi wished to show his "long held belief that play could lead to a new appreciation of sculpture." Image courtesy of Art in Public Places, Miami-Dade County Department of Cultural Affairs
Dropped Bowl with Scattered Slices and Peels
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Claes Oldenburg & Coosje van Bruggen
Comprising of eight bowl fragments in cast concrete, four peels in steel plate with a painted surface, and five orange sections executed in reinforced cast resin with a painted surface. The artists' state, "the Dropped Bowl fountain presents an imaginary moment of contact when a bowl full of orange slices and peels drops onto the plaza at the South end of the Miami-Dade County Government Center. The shape of the pools is a free version of a comic-book 'splat.' Image courtesy of Art in Public Places, Miami-Dade County Department of Cultural Affairs.
Miami Line
Rockne Krebs
Since its creation, the Miami Line has become a signature element of the downtown Miami skyline and has been featured in countless photographs. Stated Krebs, "the Miami Line was conceived as a means to generate visual drama and create an identifying element which is unique to Miami by simply enhancing what is already present." When Krebs created the first phase of the Miami Line in 1984, it was 300 feet long. Due to its great popularity, the piece was greatly expanded in 1988 to a total of 1,540 feet. Miami River Metrorail Bridge Image: Lucas Lechuga
Harmonic Convergence
Christopher Janney
Harmonic Convergence incorporates an interactive sound environment with diagonal patterns of colored glass that are integrated into the Mover Station Terminal Connector. As people navigate through the space, their activity influences the melodic layering of natural sound environments created from tropical birds, distant thunderstorms, sounds of the Everglades and other environments indigenous to South Florida. As sunlight transitions throughout the space, the colored, diagonal shaped exterior glass casts dramatic, constantly changing shadow patterns across the floor. Image courtesy of Art in Public Places, Miami-Dade County Department of Cultural Affairs.

Miami-Dade County Art in Public Places, a program of the Miami-Dade County Department of Cultural Affairs, serves the community through the implementation of art installations dedicated to enriching the public environment and to preserving and enhancing the artistic and civic pride of Miami-Dade County. Artworks are installed countywide at diverse sites including Miami International Airport, Metrorail and Metromover stations, PortMiami, Zoo Miami, Adrienne Arsht Center for the Performing Arts, parks, fire stations, libraries, police stations, public housing developments, courthouses and community health centers.

For more than a decade, the focus of the program has been on site-specific, collaborative projects that involve the thinking of artists, landscape architects, historians, engineers, and architects in a team approach.

The goals of the program are several: to enhance the artistic heritage of Miami-Dade County, to give dimension to the public environment for residents and visitors, to increase public awareness to works of art, and to promote understanding and awareness of the visual arts.

Filed Under: PUBLIC ART, FLORIDA, MIAMI
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